WHICH ONE DO YOU RUN: MIXED BAG OF MOTOR PACKAGES, CARS COMPETING WITH TRI TRACK OPEN MODIFIED SERIES

By Kyle Souza

Photo:Tom Morris/Myracenews

SEEKONK, Mass. — For years, the Tri Track Open Modified Series has drawn cars from all across the Northeast, merging some of the top Modified talent together for some of the best racing in the region. Some of the reason why the Tri Track Series is so successful with car count and stout racing on the track is because of the large array of motor packages, chassis and race teams involved.

Teams are drawn from more than five states, including New Jersey and Pennsylvania, and they all come from distinct backgrounds. Some have been running with Tri Track for years, while others watched the success the series built and decided it was time to give it a shot to chase the lucrative purse structures. Cars have come from the NASCAR Whelen Modified Tour, Race of Champions Tour and Modified Racing Series, along with locals in Modified divisions from Monadnock Speedway and Wall Stadium.

And there is more after that. Most recently, NASCAR Cup Series regular Ryan Preece competed with the Tri Track Open Modified Series at Star Speedway during an off-weekend from Cup action, finishing sixth. The Tri Track Open Modified Series offers a purse of more than $40,000 throughout the field during the 2020 season, including $6,000 to win and $1,000 to take the green flag in the feature. Even the cars that don’t qualify for the race due to the high car count still receive some bonus money before they head home.

On the motor package front, there are about eight packages that are possible. Per the Tri Track rulebook, cars come to the track with a package that they wish to run and most conform to the current rules. There are Tour Type Modified engines, SK Modified and Sportsman Modified motors, NASCAR spec engines and more in the field. Depending on the motor combination a team runs, their overall car weight might be different. For example, Tour Type Modified motors that are between 355ci-364ci are 2,610 pounds on the scales. Those between 365ci-372ci are 2,600 pounds, while a NASCAR Modified Tour spec engine must be 2,660 pounds.  

In five races during the 2019 season, three different motor packages went to Victory Lane, with each built in a different year. Matt Hirschman won with a NASCAR Spec Engine at Claremont Speedway, while he was able to pick up a victory at Oxford Plains with a 18-degree tour type engine, circa 2008. Ronnie Williams took the Gary Casella prepared No. 25 to Victory Lane with a 18-degree tour type engine that was circa 2005. Ron Silk and Bob Horn prepared a car with a circa 2004 Tour-Type engine and won at Star, while Jimmy Paige brought a 21-degree Dart Spec Head Tour Type motor built in 2018 to Victory Lane at Seekonk. 

With different motors, there are also different engine builders in the field, with names like Hutter, Performance Technology, Bob Bruneau Engines, Mike Pettit Engines, Billy the Kid Race Engines and more building for competition. Although there is a bit of a weight difference between some of the motors, it doesn’t show on the track, with different packages winning and running at the front. 

Outside of motors, there are also countless different cars and chassis builders in the field. There are a mix of Troyer, LFR (TFR Distribution), SPAFCO, Race Works, Boehler Racing, CD, Kluth, Fury and more chassis in the field. Some cars are home-built, like Boehler Racing and Matt Swanson or Rich Kluth Motorsports, while others are built in the chassis shop of a company. For example, SPAFCO Chassis supplies the car that nearly won Les Hinckley the opening race of the season at Monadnock Speedway.

Specifically last year, five different type chassis went to Victory Lane.

It’s clear that the Tri Track Open Modified Series has a wide array of drivers, cars, motors and more. But the fans remain some of the best in Modified racing and have supported the series since its inception. 

The Tri Track Open Modified Series returns to the track on Saturday, August 15, at Monadnock Speedway in Winchester, New Hampshire. With the state of New Hampshire putting a max capacity of 50 percent on the grandstands, fans coming to the track are encouraged to purchase their tickets ahead through the Monadnock website.

For more information on Monadnock Speedway, visit them at monadnockspeedway.com. For more information on the Tri Track Open Modified Series, visit tritrackmodifieds.com, and follow the series on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.

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